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Major Mom Guilt and the Start of the Suicide Watch

BRTW 8

A few years ago, it was early morning, and I was walking down the stairs to make a cup of coffee. I have this odd sense about me, and I know something is wrong. I can’t pinpoint it, and I am too exhausted to try. I feel tingly and weird and in full adrenaline mode. I turn the coffee maker on and notice we need paper towels; I go to the garage to get the towels. I see my husband’s sailing ropes laying on the ground. They are tied. My groggy brain brushes this observation off, and I go back to the kitchen to the coffee maker and look out the window. That’s weird, Scotty (age 12) is sleeping out in the grass with our Labrador, Fudge. Why? Part of me knows something isn’t right and part of me can’t comprehend why. I go outside, and he wakes up. He said Fudge was barking so he went out there to be with him. I am a smart person, I am a very intuitive person, yet I bought it, hook, line, and sinker. If only I had drunk my coffee before going in the garage, maybe I would’ve been aware and aw

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Struggling Story of 9 year's old Scotty and His Mother

A few years ago, it was early morning, and I was walking down the stairs to make a cup of coffee. I have this odd sense about me, and I know something is wrong. I can’t pinpoint it, and I am too exhausted to try. I feel tingly and weird and in full adrenaline mode. I turn the coffee maker on and notice we need paper towels; I go to the garage to get the towels. I see my husband’s sailing ropes laying on the ground.

scotty

They are tied. My groggy brain brushes this observation off, and I go back to the kitchen to the coffee maker and look out the window. That’s weird, Scotty (age 12) is sleeping out in the grass with our Labrador, Fudge. Why? Part of me knows something isn’t right and part of me can’t comprehend why. I go outside, and he wakes up. He said Fudge was barking so he went out there to be with him. I am a smart person, I am a very intuitive person, yet I bought it, hook, line, and sinker. If only I had drunk my coffee before going in the garage, maybe I would’ve been aware and a

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1 readers |0 Comments|Reply

Struggling Story of 9 year's old Scotty and His Mother

scotty

A few years ago, it was early morning, and I was walking down the stairs to make a cup of coffee. I have this odd sense about me, and I know something is wrong. I can’t pinpoint it, and I am too exhausted to try. I feel tingly and weird and in full adrenaline mode. I turn the coffee maker on and notice we need paper towels; I go to the garage to get the towels. I see my husband’s sailing ropes laying on the ground. They are tied. My groggy brain brushes this observation off, and I go back to the kitchen to the coffee maker and look out the window. That’s weird, Scotty (age 12) is sleeping out in the grass with our Labrador, Fudge. Why? Part of me knows something isn’t right and part of me can’t comprehend why. I go outside, and he wakes up. He said Fudge was barking so he went out there to be with him. I am a smart person, I am a very intuitive person, yet I bought it, hook, line, and sinker. If only I had drunk my coffee before going in the garage, maybe I would’ve been aware and aw

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Group Psychotherapy and Working with Group Dynamics in the Wilderness

Mindfullness

A group of people sitting in a circle in the wilderness is an image we can all imagine, have seen, and/or been a part of. It's a powerful image. Why is this such a powerful image? It is something that has been going on for centuries. There is inherent wisdom, not only in the act of sitting in a circle and being a part of a group but also in what the magical element of the wilderness provides to this already rich experience.

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Parent Workshop – February 8 & 9 in Clayton, GA

toccoa-landscape-1080x675

At Blue Ridge Therapeutic Wilderness, we believe that respectfully addressing the family dynamics and improving communication between parents and children throughout the entire process is paramount. The family is essential to the progress a student makes.

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The Importance of Multicultural Awareness in Wilderness Treatment Settings

g2-26-min

Many cultural and ethnic minorities have extensive experiences of being oppressed, which they may eventually internalize. However, psychology has yet to actively incorporate various forms of internalized oppression (e.g. colonial mentality [CM]) into the etiological conceptualizations of psychopathology. Using a sample of 248 Filipino Americans, the author tested more complete and socio-politically informed cultural model of depression symptoms. Results with structural equation modeling showed that conceptual model that includes CM better explained depression symptoms among Filipino Americans than the model without CM and revealed that CM had a significant direct effect on Filipino Americans’ experiences of depression symptoms. It is argued, through this illustrative case of depression symptoms among Filipino Americans, that incorporating the psychological effects of oppressive historical and contemporary conditions into our conceptualizations of ethnic minority mental health may lea

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Early Clinical Assessments at Blue Ridge Therapeutic Wilderness

All adolescent students at Blue Ridge Therapeutic Wilderness now have two layers of clinical assessment within the first fourteen days of their arrival, and from the start, Blue Ridge Primary Therapists begin the family’s therapeutic journey with even more information at hand. In its first full year, the Blue Ridge team recognized the need for a new and strengthened approach to intake and assessment. Reinforcing the intake assessment process early in a student’s stay results in stronger case conceptualization, more tailored treatment, and clearer goals established for discharge planning.

By combining the best of valid and reliable measurements, licensed Clinical Psychologist, Lorena Bradley, Ph.D. administers an in-depth initial assessment within the first two weeks of an adolescent student’s arrival at Blue Ridge. Unless the student has had comprehensive testing in the last 12 months, Dr. Bradley will meet with each new student and provide an assessment report to the Primary Therapis

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BRTW considers your child’s safety to be our primary concern.

Therefore all staff members participate in a minimum of 80 hours of initial staff training until the Executive and Field Directors believe they are proficient in the following skills:

  • Instruction in safety procedures and proper equipment usage (fuel, fire, life protection)
  • Instruction in emergency procedures like medical, evacuation, weather, or fire
  • Basic first-aid
  • Navigation skills (map and compass use for navigation)
  • Local environmental precautions (terrain, weather, insects, poisonous plants)
  • Planned response to adverse situations or emergency evacuations

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Asking Questions and Living the Answers: Finding Identity in the Wilderness

I discovered this incredible work by chance while searching through a listing of outdoor jobs on an online database in the summer of 2011. As a recent college graduate, I was neck deep in the angst of entering the job force. I had never heard of Wilderness Therapy before, and honestly, I remember feeling unsure if I wanted to do it or not. I pictured a boot camp where students just cried all day and yelled at each other as field instructors ran around saying things like, “take accountability for your actions!” or, “let the tears flow!” Nonetheless, something about it captivated my imagination. So I applied for a job as a Field Instructor and read every book about it I could get my hands on. As I read Shouting At The Sky, a book describing a writer’s personal wilderness therapy experience, I started to understand that this wasn’t like anything else I had ever heard of; it sounded compassionate, powerful, raw, even sacred.

 

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Asking Questions and Living the Answers: Finding Identity in the Wilderness

Tim

I discovered this incredible work by chance while searching through a listing of outdoor jobs on an online database in the summer of 2011. As a recent college graduate, I was neck deep in the angst of entering the job force. I had never heard of Wilderness Therapy before, and honestly, I remember feeling unsure if I wanted to do it or not. I pictured a boot camp where students just cried all day and yelled at each other as field instructors ran around saying things like, “take accountability for your actions!” or, “let the tears flow!” Nonetheless, something about it captivated my imagination. So I applied for a job as a Field Instructor and read every book about it I could get my hands on. As I read Shouting At The Sky, a book describing a writer’s personal wilderness therapy experience, I started to understand that this wasn’t like anything else I had ever heard of; it sounded compassionate, powerful, raw, even sacred.

view more

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